September 23rd: Dementia patient care in the medical radiation sciences

Image: Caring for People with Dementia: A Clinical Practice Guideline for the Radiography Workforce.

Challen, Low & McEntee, the authors of September’s paper “Dementia patient care in the diagnostic medical imaging department” argue that diagnostic MRS practitioners are grossly underprepared to work with people with dementia. What do we need to know to care for this patient population and what constitutes current best practice?

The authors define dementia as:

A syndrome, broadly characterised by ongoing neurodegeneration causing cognitive decline. Its symptoms include, but are not limited to, memory loss and deterioration in executive functions such as planning and organising skills sufficient enough to disrupt daily living. People with dementia decline from having mild cognitive symptoms which interfere with more complex daily tasks (e.g. paying bills) to severe cognitive disabilities such that they can no longer self-care.

THEMES:

1. How do you think our working practices, environments and attitudes might make the imaging or radiotherapy experience difficult and distressing for people with dementia?

2. What strategies and process changes can improve care of people with dementia undergoing imaging or radiotherapy procedures?

3. The paper talks about the concept of “personhood” and applying “personhood principles” to make the imaging [or radiotherapy] experience safe and more positive. What does this mean to you?

4. Have you ever undergone any training or education in caring for people with dementia? Tell us more & share any recommendations…

More reading:

Please also read our September blog “A Personal View of Dementia Care in Radiography” by Professor Mark McEntee.

An additional useful reading is the Society and College of Radiographer’s guidelines: SCoR: Caring for People with Dementia: A Clinical Practice Guideline for the Radiography Workforce.

See also Ashley et al for a cancer care perspective: Ashley L et al. Understanding and identifying ways to improve hospital-based cancer care and treatment for people with dementia: an ethnographic study. Age and Ageing, Volume 50, Issue 1, January 2021, Pages 233–241, https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afaa210

Wendy Mitchell is a person living with dementia – her blog is “Which me am I today?”: https://whichmeamitoday.wordpress.com/

Times: Vancouver 1pm (23rd) , Edmonton 2pm (23rd), Toronto 4pm (23rd), London 9pm (23rd), Sydney & Brisbane 6am (24th), Auckland 8am (24th)

August 25th: Simulation in Education

Simulation-based education (SBE) is being used in medical radiation science (MRS) education to provide a safe setting for students to learn clinical skills. providing a safe and less intimidating setting. SBE can support the development of a multitude of abilities such as psychomotor skills, patient safety, problem solving, team working, interpersonal and decision-making skills.

This month we will discuss the use of SBE in the MRS environment including growing areas of practice and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the uptake of SBE.

Bridge et al. International audit of simulation use in pre-registration medical radiation science training. Radiography. In press.

Themes:

  1. How is simulation used in your clinical or educational practice and how can it complement patient interaction?
  2. What benefits do you perceive that simulation has?
  3. Simulation activities have increased in education with the global pandemic, do you think this has affected learning/practice/confidence?
  4. Where do you think simulation will go next? What developments might be the most beneficial for MRS professionals?

More reading:

Shiner N. Is there a role for simulation based education within conventional diagnostic radiography? A literature review. Radiography. 2018.

Gunn et al. The use of virtual reality computed tomography simulation within a medical imaging and a radiation therapy undergraduate programme. JMRS. 2020.

Jimenez Y, Lewis S. Radiation therapy patient education using VERT: combination of technology with human care. JMRS. 2018.

Harcus J, Snaith B.Expanding training capacity for radiographer reporting using simulation: Evaluation of a pilot academy project. Radiography. 2019.

While you’re here, pop over and read this month’s blog by Naomi Shiner.

Missed the chat? Catch up with Wakelet here.

Times: Vancouver 1pm (25th) , Edmonton 2pm (25th), Toronto 4pm (25th), London 9pm (25th), Sydney & Brisbane 6am (26th), Auckland 8am (26th)

July 27th: Leadership

What do new leaders need to know? What makes a great leader? Come and share ideas and inspiration with us!

Graham, G. The Leadership Gap: Supporting New Front line Leaders in Cancer Care. JMIRS. 2020. (Image below “Priorities and perspectives on leadership”)

Themes:

  1. Graham’s definition of a leader is “someone who inspires, encourages, and guides necessary change with credibility and competence” – does this resonate with you? What else do you think makes an effective leader?
  2. New leaders can be unprepared and experience “transition shock” – if you are a leader did this happen to you? What can we do to prepare new leaders for their roles?
  3. It’s often said that we are all leaders, do you agree? What can we and our organizations do to develop individual leadership skills?
  4. Our blog this month is by one of radiography’s most eminent leaders Charlotte Beardmore. Which leaders inspire you and why?

Our July blog “Effective Leadership” is by Charlotte Beardmore, Director of Professional Policy at the Society and College of Radiographers, London, UK and President of the European Federation of Radiographers Societies, Netherlands.

Recommended reading:

Hudson, D. Reflections on leadership in advanced and consultant radiographic practice within the UK. JMIRS. 2021.

Chamunyonga, C. Leadership in the radiation therapy profession: The importance of understanding the potential benefits and theoretical perspectives. JMIRS. 2020.

Times: Vancouver 1pm (27th) , Edmonton 2pm (27th), Toronto 4pm (27th), London 9pm (27th), Sydney & Brisbane 6am (28th), Auckland 8am (28th)

Couldn’t make the chat? Catch up on Wakelet here.

June 24th: Research and Medical Imaging

There is growing interest in developing research culture and opportunities for allied health professionals working in medical imaging. However, little attention has been given to identifying the research interest and needs of this group relative to the other allied health professions. This month’s JMRS paper aimed to measure self-reported research participation, interest, experience and confidence of allied health professionals working in medical imaging and compare the findings to clinicians working in allied health therapies

Dennett et al. Research interest, experience and confidence of allied health professionals working in medical imaging: a cross-sectional survey. JMRS. 2020

Themes:

1.There are many benefits associated with a strong research culture outlined in the study (productivity, staff satisfaction and retention, and patient outcomes). Did this surprise you? What can we do to support this in our organizations?

2.The results for research participation, interest, experience and confidence in the imaging professionals group were quite similar to the other allied health professionals from the previously studied cohort. Do you think this holds true in (e.g.) the UK? What can we learn from our AHP colleagues?

3.The study found that the overall medical imaging group had “some interest” and “little experience or confidence” with research. About a third were moderately or very interested in research. Does this sound familiar in your context? Is this changing?

4.Participants were most interested in finding and reviewing literature (about 40%). Why is this important and how can we help build skills and confidence in this area?

Research interest of allied health professionals.

Times: Vancouver 1pm (24th) , Edmonton 2pm (24th), Toronto 4pm (24th), London 9pm (24th), Sydney & Brisbane 6am (25th), Auckland 8am (25th)

Missed the chat? Catch up on Wakelet here.

May 26th: Student take over!

It’s the MedRadJClub student takeover! Our May session will be helmed by Chris Gibson (@gibsonc85). Chris is a first radiography student at Canterbury Uni. He’s also a dad, former science teacher and a sometime poet!

May’s paper: Nightingale et al. Retention of radiographers: A qualitative exploration of factors influencing decisions to leave or remain within the NHS. Radiography in press.

May’s BLOG is available here: Read a student perspective on retention of radiographers by Chris Gibson.

CHAT THEMES

1. Why did you choose radiography? Is it what you expected so far?

2. Are you worried about radiographer retention? How do you think the pandemic will affect the retention of newly qualified radiographers?

3. Is there something from your training or experiences that will help to keep you in the profession once qualified?

4. Where would you like to see your career take you?

Times: Vancouver 1pm (26th) , Edmonton 2pm (26th), Toronto 4pm (26th), London 9pm (26th), Sydney & Brisbane 6am (27th), Auckland 8am (27th)

Missed the chat? Catch up on Wakelet here.